lakefront

What does Lazy Jack mean?

You’re sitting at Lazy Jack listening to some live music while you enjoy some Crab Boiled Sausage, a cold beer, and the view of Lake Pontchartrain beyond the sailboats docked in the marina. You smile and say, “ I love The Lazy Jack!”. Then someone asks you, who is The Lazy Jack? Puzzled, you laugh and reply, “I have no idea”. Well, The Lazy Jack isn’t a who. It’s a what.


Lazy Jacks are a system of lines that capture the mainsail as it drops. The Lazy Jacks sail system is a method of containing the main sail when its lowered. The Lazy Jack lines are installed either side of the main attached high up in the mast and down to the boom. Since the jacks are either side of the sail it can be dropped without falling on the deck. It makes life easier when dropping the mainsail, so you can do less work…or be “lazy”. Sailors have also been known to sleep within The Lazy Jacks. Kind of a built in hammock.

The image of a sailor kicking back in the Lazy Jacks inspired our name. Laid back. Outside. On the water. Forgetting all cares. That’s how we want yo to feel when you spend time with us. The Lazy Jack is a place where you can spend time with people you know in an atmosphere that will help you forget the rest of the world.

A piece of history at Lakeshore Landing

Built in New Orleans by Higgins Industries, the patrol-torpedo (PT) boat PT-305 was a critical asset for the US Navy during World War II, serving in European waters from 1944 to the end of the war. Heavily armed, equipped with advanced technology, uniquely maneuverable, often ingeniously modified, and reliant on cooperation and teamwork, PT boats were a perfect naval expression of the American Spirit at war. With small crews within collaborative 12-ship squadrons, they were also the home to a colorful collection of Navy sailors and a dramatic backdrop for moving personal stories of war, including the trials of cramped quarters, the terrifying thrill of combat, and humorous tales of shore-leave escapades.

Following her wartime service, PT-305 served as a New York tour boat, a fishing charter, and an oyster boat, undergoing modifications along the way: new, less-costly engines; several new paint jobs; and a dramatic reduction in length. When she was acquired by The National WWII Museum, PT-305 was in dry dock in Galveston, Texas, and in serious disrepair. In April 2007, accompanied by Museum curators, PT-305 found her way back to New Orleans, where The National WWII Museum became her home on land until she could be restored to her former glory.

Experience history like never before aboard PT-305! See and feel the PT boat experience and learn about the service of the men who called them home with PT-305—the world's only fully restored combat-veteran PT boat in operation today!

Active-duty military in uniform save 50% on rides.

Rides & Close Quarters Tours are available


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